• Users Online: 547
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Browse Articles Search Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 


 
 Table of Contents  
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 17

Prevention and treatment of COVID-19: The neglected role of complementary medicine


Department of Persian Medicine, School of Persian Medicine, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Ardakan, Yazd, Iran

Date of Submission23-Jun-2020
Date of Acceptance08-Feb-2021
Date of Web Publication08-Feb-2022

Correspondence Address:
Mohammad Saeed Kalantari Meybodi
Department of Persian Medicine, School of Persian Medicine, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Ardakan, Yazd
Iran
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijpvm.IJPVM_351_20

Rights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
Kalantari Meybodi MS. Prevention and treatment of COVID-19: The neglected role of complementary medicine. Int J Prev Med 2022;13:17

How to cite this URL:
Kalantari Meybodi MS. Prevention and treatment of COVID-19: The neglected role of complementary medicine. Int J Prev Med [serial online] 2022 [cited 2022 Sep 29];13:17. Available from: https://www.ijpvmjournal.net/text.asp?2022/13/1/17/337389



Dear Editor,

In December 2019, pneumonia caused by COVID-19 (coronavirus) was reported in China, with a mortality rate of about 2.5%.[1] Patients with the COVID-19 infection suffer from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), acute heart failure, anemia, and secondary infections.[2] Many therapeutic and prophylactic protocols have been prescribed for COVID-19. Although complementary medicine is widely used in China, its role in the prevention and treatment of COVID-19 has been overlooked.

Many herbal remedies have antiviral effects, but because no vigorous clinical trials have been conducted to show their efficacy on novel coronavirus pneumonia, these have not been discussed. However, there are complementary therapies, such as cupping, that have few side effects and can be helpful in the treatment and prevention of COVID-19.

Cupping therapy is a traditional method used in treating a wide range of diseases. The most important types are dry and wet cupping. In dry cupping, the skin is sucked into a cup either by using a flame or by using manual or electrical suction. In wet cupping, the skin is scratched, and blood is drawn into a cup during suction.[3],[4] The back, chest, and abdomen are common places for cups to be applied.[5]

Several studies identified the effects of cupping on the recovery of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, childhood asthma, and febrile upper respiratory tract infections.

Cupping is also found to be effective in the activation of the immune system via several mechanisms. It activates the complement system, increases the interferons and tumor necrosis factor, and decreases IgE and IL-2 serum levels.[4] Many researchers believe that the main effect of cupping is due to increased blood flow and excretion of waste and toxins from the body.[5]

Consequently, since COVID-19 often affects the respiratory system, and strengthening the immune system plays a key role in reducing the mortality and morbidity of the disease, it is strongly recommended that cupping be considered as a complementary treatment alongside current treatments. Equally, cupping as a preventive agent, can also be helpful.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Ji Y, Ma Z, Peppelenbosch MP, Pan Q. Potential association between COVID-19 mortality and health-care resource availability. Lancet Glob Health 2020;8:e480.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Huang C, Wang Y, Li X, Ren L, Zhao J, Hu Y, et al. Clinical features of patients infected with 2019 novel coronavirus in Wuhan, China. Lancet 2020;395:497-506.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Kim JI, Lee MS, Lee DH, Boddy K, Ernst E. Cupping for treating pain: A systematic review. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2011;2011:467014. doi: 10.1093/ecam/nep035.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Al-Bedah AM, Elsubai IS, Qureshi NA, Aboushanab TS, Ali GI, El-Olemy AT, et al. The medical perspective of cupping therapy: Effects and mechanisms of action. J Tradit Complement Med 2019;9:90-7.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Yoo SS, Tausk F. Cupping: East meets west. Int J Dermatol 2004;43:664-5.  Back to cited text no. 5
    




 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
Access Statistics
Email Alert *
Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)

 
  In this article
References

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed312    
    Printed12    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded30    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal


[TAG2]
[TAG3]
[TAG4]