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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 136

Relation of depression and anxiety disorders in choosing obesity management in obese patients


1 Department of Psychiatry, Cairo Faculty of Medicine, Al-Azhar University, Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Al-Azhar University, Egypt and Northern Border University, Saudi Arabia
3 Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Saudi Arabia
4 Department of Psychiatry, Damietta Faculty of Medicine, Al-Azhar University, Saudi Arabia
5 Department of General Surgery, Cairo Faculty of Medicine, Al-Azhar University, Saudi Arabia
6 Department of Psychiatry, Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Mohamed Abouzed
Department of Psychiatry, Cairo Faculty of Medicine, Al Azhar University
Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijpvm.ijpvm_102_21

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Background: Obesity is a chronic medical illness with a higher risk of physical and mental cascade. People who seek obesity treatment were reported to have some psychiatric disorders affecting their disease and selection of management. Aims of the Study: This study aims to estimate the prevalence of depressive and anxiety disorders in obese patients seeking obesity management and explore the relationship between common psychiatric disorders (depression and anxiety disorders) and selection of the type of obesity management (surgical or non-surgical). Methods: Patients were recruited from Alazhar Universityhospitals,Egypt, and the total number completing the study was 1115 patients. All subjects underwent psychiatric interview through Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (SCID-5 for DSM-5) for diagnosis of psychiatric disorders and completed two questionnaires, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) and Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HRSA). Results: The prevalences of depressive and anxiety disorders were 29.23% and 25.56%, respectively, in all subjects. The most prevalent diagnoses were dysthymic disorder (20.7%), general anxiety disorder (16.95%), major depressive disorder (13.04%), and social phobia (12.4%). Our sample was divided into two groups (surgical and non-surgical). Dysthymia was more common in the surgical group (21.4% versus 19.8% P = 0.560), whereas major depressive disorder was more common in the non-surgical group (7.4% versus 5.4 P = 0.593); also, the non-surgical group was more likely to have “anxiety disorders” (29.23% versus 22.4%, P = 0.840), but severity of anxiety was higher in the surgical group according to HRSA score with a highly significant difference. Conclusions: A high prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders was found among patients who sought obesity treatment. Severity of anxiety was higher in the surgical group according to HRSA score with a highly significant difference, which may affect selection of treatment, so psychiatric evaluation and management are needed before and after obesity management to improve the outcome.


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